A lawsuit has been filed against Lehigh University by a former male cook who claims that the school is responsible for him contracting Legionnaires’ disease during the summer of 2009. According to an Express-Times article, the lawsuit alleges that the HVAC system at the University Center where the man worked as a cook housed the disease, causing him to be exposed to exhaust vapor, condensation, or other HVAC byproducts. Moreover, the man is unable to work due to his poor health and other complications.

The article states that the man was hospitalized for almost a month, spending a significant amount of time in the intensive care unit because of respiratory failure. The lawsuit is seeking compensation to help offset future medical bills, lost wages, as well as other damages brought on by complications associated with the disease.

Legionnaires’ disease is considered to be a form of pneumonia, but does not spread from person to person. Bacteria that causes Legionnaires’ disease lives in water and is sometimes discovered in HVAC and plumbing systems found at hospitals, nursing homes, and other large facilities. Individuals most susceptible to the disease are those with weakened respiratory or immune systems. Nevertheless, no matter what a person’s state of health, it is crucial for them to seek medical attention right away to ensure proper and timely treatment.

As this specific story demonstrates, Legionnaires’ disease is a serious condition that can put a person’s life in danger and present life-altering challenges on a physical and financial level. If you or someone you care about has suffered from this dangerous medical condition and you believe that another person’s negligence is to blame, you may be able to seek compensation. To learn more about your legal rights and options, call Steven H. Heisler, “The Injury Lawyer,” at 877-228-4878 for a free consultation. As a Legionnaires’ disease attorney, Mr. Heisler will build a strong case on your behalf to ensure that negligent parties are held liable.



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